Breeders’ Cup: Elite Racing Returns to Churchill Downs

Churchill Downs Racetrack in Louisville, Kentucky, has been the home of countless historical moments for over a century, primarily centered around the Kentucky Derby. From the elite champions such as War Admiral (1937), Omaha (1935) and Secretariat (1973) to the major upsets like Giacomo (2005), Charismatic (1999) and Mine That Bird (2009), every Derby leaves a lasting impression on those who attend or watch.

Up until 1988, the Fall Meet at Churchill Downs primarily gave horseracing fans a preview of the upcoming Kentucky Derby and Oaks contenders, but would not host very many other notable horses. That changed in 1988 when the Breeders’ Cup, then a relatively new day of championship racing, made its debut under the famous Twin Spires.

Horseracing: Take What They Are Giving

 

American Pharoah with Victor Espinoza up wins the Belmont Stakes and Triple Crown at Belmont Park Race Track, NY 6.6.2015

Maybe it’s just a sign of the times, but lately, most every horse player I converse with is dead set on procuring a life changing score. The advent, and hence marketing of, elaborate pari-mutual menus which promise acute financial solvency has no doubt led to this “shoot for the moon mentality” among punters yet while attempting to take down Santa Anita Race Course’s pick-6 is admirable, it’s also highly unlikely. On some days (maybe you can relate) I can’t select a single winner never mind six in a row and although keying multiple racers in each leg of a prolonged horizontal wager augments one’s margin for error, bankrolls become devastated when copious equine inclusion goes awry.

Penny Chenery: The Queen of the Sport of Kings

Secretariat became a national celebrity when he won the Triple Crown in 1973.

The horse racing superstar captured the Kentucky Derby and then rolled in the Preakness Stakes before turning in a dazzling performance in the Belmont Stakes, winning by an astounding 31 lengths.

The colt known as “Big Red” became the first Triple Crown winner in 25 years – setting records in all three legs – and ran himself onto the cover of Sports Illustrated, Time and Newsweek magazines.

Triple Crown Triumph: Skill or Chance?

Is horse racing a game of skill or a game of chance? Maybe it’s both. To reach the greatest heights in racing, you not only need great skill, but also a bevy of factors to properly align.

In 2015, American Pharoah proved himself early, overcoming troubled starts and bad weather, while taking down the competition time and time again. After his win in the Kentucky Derby (gr. 1), it was clear this was a special horse that could make his own luck.

Q&A with Jonathon Kinchen: Horseplayer Eligible for $2 Million Bonus

Kinchen2As the winner of the National Handicapping Championship Tour, Jonathon Kinchen is now eligible for a $2 million bonus if he also wins the NHC finale, which carries an $800,000 first-place prize.

He will have the maximum two of more than 600 entries for the Jan. 28-30 championship held in Las Vegas at Treasure Island Casino.

Trackside Jennie Rees caught up with the horseplayer in this Q&A.

Unleashing Brilliance: American Pharoah and the Triple Crown

History was made this June with a stunning and unlikely feat. After a thirty-seven year interlude, one horse, American Pharoah, won each of the three major races that make up the Triple Crown: the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes and the Belmont Stakes.

Since the first Triple Crown winner in 1919, Sir Barton, only 12 horses have been awarded the prestigious honor, making this triumphant victory so gallant and thrilling to those who follow horse racing, as well as to those who became intrigued with the magnificence of this standout horse.